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Blog Entry# 3403702
Posted: May 10 (16:01)

3 Responses
Last Response: May 10 (20:07)
➡️Why is elevation from the sea level written at the railway station ?
➡️Basically, it is intended for loco drivers, guards and railway engineers as it tells the gradient(slope) between two stations.
It comes to help while laying down the tracks and even if the train is moving from higher level to lower level or vice versa , then loco driver knows how much speed has to be maintained .Another application is that it is also used for telecommunication to know the coverage area of radio station but it does not come into play nowadays as we have GPS system.
#faq

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May 10 (16:29)
959298/HOG WAM4 WAP1~   3783 blog posts
To be precise, the MSL doesn't really indicate the gradient between stations. IR has strict guidelines for gradients in yards, stations and between stations (depending on kind of traffic expected). So, irrespective of the MSL of two successive stations, the track is always laid out in such a way that the gradients are within a limit. So, the MSL markings are practically of no use to the Loco Pilots. The LPs depend on the gradient markings provided all along the route, and their knowledge of the route (through their route learning) and the working timetable provided to them that indicates all the speed limits on the route.
For example, between Karjat and Lonavala, within a span of 27 km, the line ascends almost 500m. IN the VSKP-Kirandul section, between SUP-SMLG, the line ascends almost 1000m over a distance of 60km. However, the ruling gradient is very different between both sections.
The MSL markings are a relic from earlier days when they were the only way to determine the difference in elevation between different places. With the advent of satellite imagery, this has become redundant. But the practice is still continued as during the surveys for constructing new railway lines and stations, the elevations and MSL are also collected as a part of the Civil Engineering surveys.
Very useful info ....
Thanks , Added to FAQ !
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